Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll House – Favorite Plays

 Perhaps, my favorite would have to be Ibsen’s A Doll House, especially for its shocking ending (and not because I haven’t read the others…) Without spoilers, Ibsen was inspired by the belief that “a woman cannot be herself in modern society,” since it is “an exclusively male society, with laws made by men and with prosecutors and judges who assess feminine conduct from a masculine standpoint.” Ibsen himself used the most subtle details including the concept of mimetic and diegetic space, sartorial metaphors (think Sailor Moon transformations but more meaningful), and much more in his depiction of the relations between the wife and husband in a traditional Victorian household (thanks, AP English Literature). For any reader who enjoys a melodrama, especially one involving debts, secrecy, and Italian dancing, I highly recommend this play.

The best plays of Henrik Ibsen Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) is undoubtedly the most famous Norwegian playwright who has ever lived. He wrote a number of classic plays in a variety of modes and genres, so in this post we’ve limited ourselves to five of Ibsen’s very best plays. Hedda Gabler. The role of Hedda Gabler […]

via The Best Henrik Ibsen Plays Everyone Should Read — Interesting Literature

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2 thoughts on “Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll House – Favorite Plays

  1. Which other plays have you read? Besides the one you name here, I have only read Rosmersholm, which is on a number of the same themes, though less on women in particular, and more on the “new ideas” generally.

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    • Only a few; I read Tony Kushner’s Angels in American, Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and part of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. They tend to be critiques though, nothing as focused on women as Ibsen’s A Doll House (except maybe The Crucible but only a bit).

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